THE INSPIRATION FOR THE HELLO HUBS

“A Hello Hub, to me, is like the grandchild of the ‘Hole in the Wall’, 16 years later.” Sugata Mitra 

Across the globe there is a pressing need to make quality education accessible to children and adults in the most disadvantaged countries and communities. Child-led digital education is one such solution. Project Hello World works to provide access to digital education to children who are enrolled in traditional schools as well as those out of school, or living on the streets, who are in desperate need of educational opportunities.

The idea of promoting child-led digital education was pioneered by the work of Sugata Mitra, Professor of Educational Technology at Newcastle University/UK, and an Advisor to Projects For All.

Professor Mitra is best known for the ‘Hole in the Wall’ experiment where he put computer stations, equipped with educational materials and games, into slums in India, allowing underprivileged children and adults to express themselves, explore together, immerse themselves in learning activities, teach each other and collaborate in solving problems. Professor Mitra’s method has proven that providing children with the opportunity to teach themselves capitalises on their innate desire to learn and can take the educational process to new heights.

Moreover, studies have shown that children who are given access to digital education have vastly improved scores in digital literacy as well as higher numeracy and literacy.

FEATURES OF CHILD-LED DIGITAL LEARNING BY PROF SUGATA MITRA

Across the globe there is a pressing need to make quality education accessible to children and adults in the most disadvantaged countries and communities. Child-led digital education is one such solution and Project Hello World works to provide access to digital education to children who are enrolled in traditional schools as well as those out of school, or living on the streets, who are in desperate need of educational opportunities and access to information.

The idea of promoting child-led digital education was pioneered by the work of Sugata Mitra, Professor of Educational Technology at Newcastle University/UK, and an Advisor to Projects For All.

Professor Mitra is best known for the ‘Hole in the Wall’ experiment where he put computer stations, equipped with educational materials and games, into slums in India, allowing underprivileged children and adults to express themselves, explore together, immerse themselves in learning activities, teach each other and collaborate in solving problems. Professor Mitra’s method has proven that providing children with the opportunity to teach themselves capitalises on their innate desire to learn and can take the educational process to new heights.

Moreover, studies have shown that children who are given access to digital education have vastly improved scores in digital literacy as well as higher numeracy and literacy scores.

Accessibility

Learning Stations are placed in a public setting near a playground or school to allow free access to both in-school and out-of-school children. This also ensures that children can independently take ownership of the Learning Stations and learn in self-organised groups.

Collaboration

Learning Stations foster collaborative learning among groups of children. They can explore, research, share, teach and learn even more as a result of this exchange of knowledge. As many children can use the Learning Stations at the same time, the Hubs are more efficient than traditional computer labs.

Integration

Learning Stations can be integrated into  the schooling system. Child-led digital education promotes higher test scores and constructive in-class behaviour. The Learning Stations  encourage peer discussions, increased curiosity and better retention.

Analytical skills

Learning Stations foster the development of fundamental skills such as learning to learn, problem solving, and critical thinking. By learning to use a computer and educational software, the children also learn to analyse, evaluate and synthesise information, thereby gaining lifelong attributes.

Problem solving

By applying their analytical skills, children can help to solve real-world problems in the community. They can use the Learning Stations to find information, compile data and prepare reports, and thus have a positive impact on their surroundings and communities.

Source: The Hole in the Wall

LITERACY AND NUMERACY IMPROVEMENT

The graphs below show the overall improvement on the test scores in each category in percent.

CHILDREN ENROLLED IN SCHOOL
CHILDREN NOT ENROLLED IN SCHOOL

COMPUTER LITERACY SCORE IMPROVEMENT

Overall

Computer literacy score improved by 423% over 1 month for children using the station compared to those without access.

Practical

Practical use of computers improved by 1060% over 1 month for children using the station compared to those without access.

Theoretical

Theoretical understanding of how computers work improved by 250% over 1 month for children using the station compared to those without access.

Integration

Children with access to the station and receiving IT training in school scored 5.5% higher than children, who only received IT training.